Alcoholics Anonymous Overview support-groups

How Alcoholics Anonymous Started


Continuously providing help and support to alcoholic addicted persons for 80 years is what Alcoholic Anonymous (AA) does best. Founded in 1935 by Bill Wilson and Dr. Bob Smith (who both were recovering alcoholics), Alcoholics Anonymous were started as a community fellowship for recovering alcoholics to encourage them to stay sober. 12 steps were developed by the pair to go on the meetings of AA. They later also introduced the 12 traditions further to help define the purpose within the group. The original 12 steps are still intact; besides, many former alcohol addicts contribute to the group by helping the members make steps to recovery.


Today, Alcoholics Anonymous has more than 2,000,000 active members all over the world and more than 50 thousand of support groups countrywide.


What To Expect From AA

It can be extremely intimidating and uncomfortable to come to a conclusion to attend an AA meeting, especially for individuals who have no idea about what to expect. This is to be expected because the meetings involve telling people whom you've probably never met that you're an addict and that you need assistance. Fortunately, every participant within AA is fully aware about how the other feels. The fact that the group was started by people that were former alcoholics shows that it can really help you. Everybody who is involved in AA activity has been its attendee before, which creates a unique feeling of solidarity and mutual understanding among the addicts.


At each AA meeting, the attendees are welcomed to join the group. The best way to recover is through opening up about your journey but it is not mandatory to speak in the meetings. AA has the understanding that a number of people cannot be comfortable with sharing their intimate details during the initial visits to the organisation. After some time, they start feeling at home and find tremendous relief and healing through openly sharing their experiences.


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What Are Closed And Open Meetings

A closed AA meeting is attended only by recovering alcoholic addicts or those seeking to know how to go about kicking the habit.

Partners, family and pals are allowed to attend open meetings. You may choose the type of meeting you feel comfortable attending. A certain share of the people attending these meetings prefer to keep their therapy separated from the rest of their lives. There those who need family and friends to be there when they attend the meetings.


AA 12 Steps

Alcoholics Anonymous is the first group that came up with the 12 stages of achieving addiction recovery which is currently being used by other communities. Despite the steps being presented in linear fashion participants are known to view them as an ongoing circle. The member needs to be comfortable with every step before they can move to the next stage.

The first step includes admitting that you have a problem, and really need help to solve it. Admitting and accepting your mistakes, making an effort to correct these errors and deciding to always try and improve are some of the steps that follow. More on the 12 steps can be found here


Reasons For Not Going To AA Meetings

Withdrawal symptoms and other uncomfortable things one goes through as they try to quit alcohol abuse discourage many from attending the AA meetings. Some of the common oppositions which people have in mind are

  • They don't see if they'll get the assistance they need
  • They do not want to risk meeting someone they know
  • They haven't yet accepted they are addicts and need help

Knowing the main objective of attending the meeting will help you overcome some of these excuses and recover from your addiction.

If you suspect that the problem exists, you're probably right. There will be no harm for you if you go to a meeting; besides, it can potentially save you from years of suffering caused by your addiction.


How To Find An Alcoholic Anonymous Group

Regardless of where you are living you will not have any difficulties in finding an AA group within the locality. The meetings held many times so you can catch the next one soon. Our meeting finder can help you to locate a group near you depending on whether you're looking for an open or closed meeting. If you're looking for an AA group, we can assist you to find one just contact 0800 246 1509.