Twelve Step Programs support-groups

The Goal Of The 12 Steps

The 12 steps and traditions, known as the Alcoholics Anonymous, is one of the earliest programs designed to help people through recovery and is regarded by many as the yardstick for assessing any program that claims to help people break free from reliance on any substance or alcohol.


Alcoholics Anonymous 12 Steps is a step by step guideline to assist drug and alcoholic addicts overcome vain attempt to quit at their will. Other sustenance groups shaped the 12 Steps to their type of dependence thanks to the triumph of the program especially in the beginning. Despite inclination to spirituality, 12 step programs are today adapted and used in non-religious settings for assistance. Room was made for a variety of explanations of the concept according to how people can explain the idea of a God.


The 12 steps is also used by many other groups such as Debtors Anonymous and Cocaine Anonymous as different groups were formed to handle a variety of addiction problems.


The 12 Step Programme And Its Effectiveness

Due to the anonymous nature installed by the AA, and lack of provided information, it is difficult to know how effective the 12-step guide actually is. However, with the popularity the 12-step program has, and the personal success stories that are available, it is easy to suggest the model is effective.

12 Step model program is noted for support, encouragement and accountability by those who have been there done and have overcome addiction. Numerous ex addicts have kept away from drugs because this model offers regular meetings which increase social sustenance.


The Twelve Steps Of AA Alcoholics Anonymous

The group recognizes that recovery does not end with rehab hence it is all up to the recovering patient to adapt the best plan that works for his recovery. Some patients take on multiple steps at a time while some feel the need to step back and redo a previous step if they feel that it helps in tackling the current progress that they have.

Take a look at explanation of 12 Alcoholics Anonymous steps

  • Acknowledging your life is controlled by alcohol - makes the difference in shifting focus and attention to treatment.
  • We seek the help of a support system with the power greater than us to help us recover.
  • Decided to give over our own will and our lives to the trust of God as we see and understand.
  • Self-appraisal is what we have done without any reservations.
  • Revealed the dark aspect of our behaviour to God, ourselves, and others.
  • We are ready for God to rid the bad characteristics in us.
  • Asked Him to eradicate our inadequacies.
  • Ready to make up with people we have offended after writing their names down.
  • Seek restoration of broken relationships caused by addiction without strings attached by checking out with the person first.
  • Make a daily examination of ourselves and acknowledge our shortcomings and accept it.
  • Seek consolation from God through prayer and quiet time to understand and increase your knowledge of God's love help you to get a new sense of direction and perspective in future life.
  • Achieving spiritual enlightenment with these steps, we wield ourselves as instruments in helping others who are suffering what we had suffered before.

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The Book Of Twelve Traditions

12 Traditions primarily target Alcoholics Anonymous group members, in addition to paying special attention and focus on individual transformation during the process. Alcoholics Anonymous are directed according to the principles in a book known as the Big Book.

Many other addiction groups have adapted the 12 traditions into their own recovery process.

We can help you find an AA group near you, so pick up the phone and call us today on 0800 246 1509.


The 12 traditions are

  • The group's well-being is our top priority as it is where our individual success is dependent.
  • AA ultimate goal focuses on the authority of the love of God expressed through the group's common collective participation activities in sessions.
  • AA has trusted servants who share concerns with the led.
  • The readiness to quit alcoholic beverages is what a person needs to become a member of AA.
  • Each individual group should be autonomous, only in situations that affect other parties of the AA as a whole will this need be accepted.
  • There is only one purpose per group, and that is the help those are still under the clutches of alcohol.
  • Each group/chapter abstains from activities that deviate from our single purpose and should never get involved with any financial or enterprising endeavours.
  • External financial help has to be refused because every AA group should completely rely on itself.
  • We should maintain our "non professionalism", but the service centres we offer can employ specialist workers.
  • AA shouldn't be prearranged; we may form service boards or teams which are in charge of those they help.
  • AA does not engage on matters outside the group's primary concerns and do not take part in public debate.
  • Our matters on external policy are focused on attracting not advertising; we have to preserve our privacy with press, radio, and films.
  • Our principles come first before personalities, our anonymity lays the foundation of our traditions as a group.

Looking For Therapy

Are you looking for a 12-Step program that will help you overcome your trouble of addiction? You will discover the right program that suits you with more than 50,000 Alcoholics Anonymous groups spread all over the nation (and thousands of other Anonymous groups that work with different substance abuse).