Talk To Frank resources-for-family

More Regarding Talk To Frank

In the UK, Talk to Frank has been operating the anti-drugs campaign for a long time on its own. Though, has the campaign stopped anybody from using any drugs?

A police Swat team in the UK burst into a kitchen of a quiet suburban home, and the results were a complete turnaround of the way drug education was done for good. Out went horrid notices of how medications could "mess you up" and sincere appeals to oppose the vile pushers prowling in each play area. A lighter, more humorous approach was used instead.


The first advert presented an adolescent inviting the police to come and arrest his mum because the mum wanted them to talk about drugs. But the new information being passed is "Drugs are illegal. Talking about them isn't. So, Talk to Frank."


Frank Cordial Private Drug Guidance

An idea that started with someone's mother, Frank was now the new name of the National Drugs Helpline. It was supposed to be the symbol of a reliable older brother that younger individuals can go to for guidance regarding illegal substances. In the bid to make the Frank label a very popular one among the young people in the country, programs like the tour round a brain house, and Pablo the canine drugs mule were all incorporated.


The agency behind Frank has said that it was crucial that Frank was never actually seen so he could never be the target of ridicule for wearing the wrong thing or trying to be cool. Parody videos on YouTube have not been able to disrespect Frank either. There's also no indication that Frank is working for the government, which is unusual for a government funded campaign.

Right from the days of Nancy Reagan, a lot has been done about drugs education, and the Grange Hill cast which a lot of people opine that it did more harm than good, simply encouraged people to "Just Say No" to drugs.


The majority of the advertisements in Europe currently concentrate, like Frank, on attempting to share objective info to assist youngsters to make their own choices. In some places where there are still tough penalties for possession, ads showing prison bars or disappointed parents are still the norm. You play, you pay is a campaign that was launched in Singapore recently.

In the UK, the government has burned through millions on Above the Influence, a long-running movement that urges positive contrasting options to drug usage utilizing a blend of amusement and useful examples. The focus of the campaign is to talk to the youth in a language they understand, like the one ad showing a group of "stoners" stranded on a coach. Though, an unexpected number of anti-drug campaigns all over the globe still resort back to strategies intended to arouse fear or alarm, specifically the substance-fuelled plunge to hell. A good example is a Canadian commercial that appeared recently and formed part of the DrugsNot4Me series in which a beautiful, self-assured young woman changes into a trembling, hollow-eyed skeleton because of "drugs".

A study carried out in the UK on anti-drugs campaign that ran between 1999 and 2004 shows that adverts that portray the negative results of drug use influence vulnerable youth to try out with the drugs.


Frank broke new ground and was abundantly critiqued by opposed Conservative politicians at the while for setting out to propose that drugs may offer highs in addition to lows.


An early ad posted online told viewers, "Cocaine makes you feel on top of the world."

It was not generally simple to get the balance of the message accurate. The man in arrears the cocaine advertisement, Matt Powell, then creative director of digital agency Profero, now disbelieves he overvalued the focus span of the ordinary web browser. Some might not have adhered around to the finish of the liveliness to get some answers concerning the negative impacts. However, Powell says the point was to be more legitimate with youngsters about medications, keeping in mind the end goal to build up the believability of the Frank brand.

The Home Office says 67% of youngsters in a study said they would swing to Frank in the event that they required drug guidance. In 2011 and 2012, Frank received 225,892 calls and 3,341,777 visits to the website. These figures provide proof that the Frank approach bears results.

Though, like with any other anti-drug media campaign around the globe, there's no proof that Frank has stopped people to use substances.

More than 9% drop has been witnessed in the country since the campaign came into place, but a drop in the use of cannabis has been given as an explanation for this, probably because teenagers are changing their approach towards tobacco smoking.


Frank - What Is It?

FRANK is a nationwide drug education programme designed and run by the British government's Department of Health in collaboration with the Home Office in 2003. It's main aim is to inform young people about the dangers of alcohol and drugs, so as to bring down the rate of consumption of both legal and illegal drugs. It has had several media campaigns on the Internet and the radio.


Ready to Get Help?

CALL US NOW ON 0800 246 1509



Services

FRANK has the following resources for anyone looking for information about drugs

  • A dedicated website
  • A 24 hour telephone line that is strictly confidential
  • Email
  • A confidential live chat service, available from 2pm-6pm daily
  • A service to help find appropriate counselling or treatment