Symptoms what-is-addiction

The Signs And Symptoms Of Addiction

A sign is something others, like the doctor, see, whilst a symptom is something that the patient discerns and explains. To give an example, enlarged pupils can be a sign, whilst sleepiness can be a symptom.

Drug addiction - when an individual is dependent on a substance, like a drug, nicotine or alcohol, he/she is unable to manage his/her use of that substance. Even if the substance poses a danger, they will still take it whether or not they know the dangers.


Drug addiction can lead to strong cravings. It's possible that the addict wants to stop taking the substance but finds it really hard to do so on his or her own.


The condition of the person, their family lineage, the substance in question, and the person involved are some of the factors that determine the possible signs and symptoms of addiction.

Some signs and symptoms of abuse could be

  • It becomes difficult for the person to desist from using the substance - like drug, alcohol or nicotine, even when the person has attempted to stop at least on one occasion.
  • Withdrawal symptoms - mental and physical reactions happen when the levels of the substance in the body drop below a certain level. There are urges, spells of moodiness, fits of rage, poor concentration, a feeling of being sad and empty, anger, resentment and frustration.
  • The person may also develop a voracious appetite. A sleeping disorder is a typical side effect of withdrawal. Sometimes, the user might have GI symptoms, like constipation or diarrhoea. With a few substances, withdrawal can trigger viciousness, trembling, seizures, fantasies and sweats.
  • The addiction carries on regardless of health problems - an addicted person cannot take the drug even if they have developed sickness through taking it. A case in point is when a smoker will continue to smoke even with a diagnosis of lung or heart disease.
  • Public and leisure forfeiture - Some people abandon their lifestyles to pursue drugs. To give an example, an alcoholic might decline an invitation to spend a day on a boat or to go camping when no alcohol is at hand, a smoker might choose not to meet with friends in a pub/restaurant that prohibits smoking.
  • Maintaining a good supply - even when there is no money, addicts will always ensure that they have enough quantity of the substance they are addicted to. Sacrifices might be made in other parts of their budget so they can make sure they always have their substance of choice.
  • Taking risks (1) - now and again the dependent individual ensure he/she can get his/her substance, for example, taking or exchanging sex for cash/drugs.
  • Taking risks (2) - driving at a higher speed is one of the risks the addict may easily take when they have taken the substance.
  • Coping with issues - an addict often feels he/she requires his/her substance to cope with his/her issues.
  • Fixation - an addict may spend more energy and time concentrating on manners of to get his/her drug, and in certain instances on how to use the drug.
  • Secrecy and solitude - the addict may resort to enjoying these substances in solitude in most cases.
  • Denial - most people suffering from addiction refuse to admit it. They don't know (or decline to recognise) that they have an issue.
  • Excess consumption - the individual takes too much of drugs, nicotine or alcohol in some cases of addiction. Some consequences to this are blacking out and not being able to remember periods of time and even physical symptoms, like the presence of a persistent cough or sore throat in a heavy smoker.
  • Dropping diversions and exercises - as the compulsion advances the individual may quit doing things he/she used to appreciate a considerable measure. This can even happen to smokers who discover that they can't physically do the sports or outdoor activities that the once enjoyed.
  • Having stashes - the dependent individual may have little supplies of their substance shrouded away in various parts of the house or auto; frequently in improbable spots.
  • Taking an initial large dose - alcohol abuse normally has this symptom. The person my down drinks in an attempt to become intoxicated and then feel great.
  • Legal problems - problems with the law occur more with drug and alcohol addictions. This can be because being on the substance impairs the user's judgement and they engage in risk taking behaviour or because the addict breaks the law to get a hold of the substance.
  • Money problems - if the drug is costly, the addicted person may neglect or cut down on other needs to afford it. In the case of cigarettes, it will cost a 40-a-day smoker up to '660 per month and about '8,000 per year in the UK and other parts of Europe and the UK where a packet of twenty sticks is sold at about '11.
  • Relationship issue; these are more normal in drug/liquor fixation.

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Some people who abuse drugs or alcohol might not be technically addicted but can still suffer the effects mentioned here but do not usually suffer from withdrawal symptoms or have the same obsession to use the substance.